obsessedwiththeroyals:

I seriously think Queen Rania of Jordan needs more appreciation

While her statements here are very true it is important to remember that she is part of an un-democratic regime which is hugely problematic. Read Human Rights Watch's and Freedom House's reports on the country.

(via gtfothinspo)

- xkcd

- xkcd

(Source: thedailyfallout, via femininefreak)

The Confidence Gap

worklabournewsresearch:

image

"For years, we women have kept our heads down and played by the rules. We’ve been certain that with enough hard work, our natural talents would be recognized and rewarded.”

"We’ve made undeniable progress… Our competence has never been more obvious. Those who closely follow society’s shifting values see the world moving in a female direction."

"And yet, as we’ve worked, ever diligent, the men around us have continued to get promoted faster and be paid more."

"Some observers say children change our priorities… Other commentators point to cultural and institutional barriers to female success. There’s truth in that, too. But these explanations for a continued failure to break the glass ceiling are missing something more basic: women’s acute lack of confidence."

"Compared with men, women don’t consider themselves as ready for promotions, they predict they’ll do worse on tests, and they generally underestimate their abilities. This disparity stems from factors ranging from upbringing to biology."

"[This] shortage of female confidence is increasingly well quantified and well documented.”

Read the remainder of this article, written by the authors of Womenomics and The Confidence Code, Katty Kay and Claire Shipman, to learn more about this confidence gap, the evidence, and the consequences, and what to do about it.

How confident are you? Click here to take the confidence quiz.

The Atlantic, April 14, 2014: “The Confidence Gap,” by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman

Institute of Leadership & Management, February 2011: “Ambition and  gender at work” (16 pages, PDF)
friendlycloud:

Remarkable Women in History by Country: Sudan
Amanirenas
The Kingdom of Kush lay to the South of Egypt and is famous for its more pointed pyramids. Several Queens have ruled Kush, but one of the greatest is certainly Amanirenas. Ruling for about 30 years, she led her forces against the Romans in Egypt. After initial success, the Romans pushed back. A peace treaty was then signed, by terms favorable to Kush.
A contemporary of Cleopatra, Amanirenas was probably blind in one eye.
Masterlist of Countries: remarkable women in history

friendlycloud:

Remarkable Women in History by Country: Sudan

Amanirenas

The Kingdom of Kush lay to the South of Egypt and is famous for its more pointed pyramids. Several Queens have ruled Kush, but one of the greatest is certainly Amanirenas. Ruling for about 30 years, she led her forces against the Romans in Egypt. After initial success, the Romans pushed back. A peace treaty was then signed, by terms favorable to Kush.

A contemporary of Cleopatra, Amanirenas was probably blind in one eye.

Masterlist of Countries: remarkable women in history

(via friendlycloud)

halftheskymovement:

Ameerah Al-Taweel was just 18 when she met Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal, one of the 30 richest men in the world, at an interview for her school paper. She became a princess when the two wed nine months later. But the story didn’t end there. “I didn’t want to be that girl who’s not doing anything,” she says. “I wanted to make an impact.”
Al-Taweel has worked with everyone from former President Bill Clinton to Jordan’s Queen Rania and the British royal family to advance the rights of women in the Middle East. Although she and the prince divorced last year, Al-Taweel continues to advocate for Saudi women’s rights, including the right to drive, inherit equally, and retain custody of children after divorce. “I want to be the one women look to when they tell their daughters, ‘Look, she got a divorce and see what she’s doing now? She’s an independent woman. She’s doing something good for her country. She’s a role model.’”
Read more via Glamour.

halftheskymovement:

Ameerah Al-Taweel was just 18 when she met Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal, one of the 30 richest men in the world, at an interview for her school paper. She became a princess when the two wed nine months later. But the story didn’t end there. “I didn’t want to be that girl who’s not doing anything,” she says. “I wanted to make an impact.”

Al-Taweel has worked with everyone from former President Bill Clinton to Jordan’s Queen Rania and the British royal family to advance the rights of women in the Middle East. Although she and the prince divorced last year, Al-Taweel continues to advocate for Saudi women’s rights, including the right to drive, inherit equally, and retain custody of children after divorce. “I want to be the one women look to when they tell their daughters, ‘Look, she got a divorce and see what she’s doing now? She’s an independent woman. She’s doing something good for her country. She’s a role model.’”

Read more via Glamour.

"I was born a baby, not a boy."

— Janet Mock (via b00ksmartdevil)

(via gtfothinspo)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Catherine Flon circa 1803
Art by Tofu (tumblr, website)
Mixed media incorporating maps of Haiti and maps of countries that played a role in Haitian history.
In the late 1700s, Haiti was the most profitable colony in the Americas.  Sugar and coffee plantations had made the small oligarchy of French colonists wealthy on the backs of enslaved Africans.  The French Revolution brought the situation to a boiling point.  Conflict developed among the white landowners over whether or not Haiti should seek independence from France.  Free people of color began to lobby for the rights decreed by the National Assembly of France in its “Declaration of the Rights of Man.”  After a series of smaller revolts, the enslaved people of Haiti sensed an opportunity in the political unrest and began a mass rebellion on August 22, 1791.
Towards the end of the Haitian Revolution, there was a need for the insurgents to unite under one flag.  Legend says that on May 18, 1803 the Haitian revolutionary leader Jean-Jacques Dessalines ripped the white center out of the French tricolor and asked his goddaughter Catherine Flon to create a new flag with the remaining blue and red bands.  The anniversary of this date is celebrated as the Haitian Flag Day.  Catherine Flon is considered a national hero and her image has appeared on Haitian currency.  

coolchicksfromhistory:

Catherine Flon circa 1803

Art by Tofu (tumblrwebsite)

Mixed media incorporating maps of Haiti and maps of countries that played a role in Haitian history.

In the late 1700s, Haiti was the most profitable colony in the Americas.  Sugar and coffee plantations had made the small oligarchy of French colonists wealthy on the backs of enslaved Africans.  The French Revolution brought the situation to a boiling point.  Conflict developed among the white landowners over whether or not Haiti should seek independence from France.  Free people of color began to lobby for the rights decreed by the National Assembly of France in its “Declaration of the Rights of Man.”  After a series of smaller revolts, the enslaved people of Haiti sensed an opportunity in the political unrest and began a mass rebellion on August 22, 1791.

Towards the end of the Haitian Revolution, there was a need for the insurgents to unite under one flag.  Legend says that on May 18, 1803 the Haitian revolutionary leader Jean-Jacques Dessalines ripped the white center out of the French tricolor and asked his goddaughter Catherine Flon to create a new flag with the remaining blue and red bands.  The anniversary of this date is celebrated as the Haitian Flag Day.  Catherine Flon is considered a national hero and her image has appeared on Haitian currency.  

wilsoncenter:

What do Rwanda, Afghanistan, and Iraq beat America at? Having women in congress/parliament
Countries with better representation of women in government than the United States (hat tip to our Women in Public Service Project):
Rwanda - 56%
Andorra - 50%
Cuba - 45%
Sweden - 45%
Seychelles - 44%
Senegal - 43%
Finland - 43%
South Africa - 42%
Nicaragua - 40%
Iceland - 40%
Norway - 40%
Mozambique - 39%
Denmark - 39%
Netherlands - 39%
Costa Rica - 39%
Timor-Leste - 39%
Belgium - 38%
Argentina - 37%
Mexico - 37%
Tanzania - 36%
Spain - 36%
Uganda - 35%
Angola - 34%
Serbia - 33%
Nepal - 33%
Germany - 33%
Macedonia - 33%
Ecuador - 32%
Slovenia - 32%
New Zealand - 32%
Algeria - 32%
Guyana - 31%
Burundi - 31%
Switzerland - 29%
Portugal - 29%
Trinidad and Tobago - 29%
Austria - 28%
Ethiopia - 28%
Afghanistan - 28%
France - 27%
Lesotho - 27%
Tunisia - 27%
Belarus - 27%
South Sudan - 27%
El Salvador - 26%
Bolivia - 25%
Iraq - 25%
Laos - 25%
Canada - 25%
Australia - 25%
Sudan - 25%
Lithuania - 25%
Vietnam - 24%
Namibia - 24%
Kazakhstan - 24%
Singapore - 24%
Liechtenstein - 24%
Croatia - 24%
Poland - 24%
Kyrgyzstan - 23%
Latvia - 23%
Bulgaria - 23%
Philippines - 23%
Pakistan - 23%
United Kingdom - 23%
Malawi - 22%
Mauritania - 22%
Czech Republic - 22%
Eritrea - 22%
Uzbekistan - 22%
Luxembourg - 22%
Peru - 22%
Italy - 21%
Boznia and Herzegovina - 21%
China - 21%
Greece - 21%
Cape Verde - 21%
Estonia - 21%
Dominican Republic - 21%
Cambodia - 20%
Israel - 20%
Moldova - 20%
Bangladesh - 20%
Honduras - 20%
Monaco - 19%
Tajikistan - 19%
Mauritius - 19%
Slovak Republic - 19%
Indonesia - 19%
Sao Tome and Principe - 18%
United States - 18%
(source: World Bank)

wilsoncenter:

What do Rwanda, Afghanistan, and Iraq beat America at? Having women in congress/parliament

Countries with better representation of women in government than the United States (hat tip to our Women in Public Service Project):

  1. Rwanda - 56%
  2. Andorra - 50%
  3. Cuba - 45%
  4. Sweden - 45%
  5. Seychelles - 44%
  6. Senegal - 43%
  7. Finland - 43%
  8. South Africa - 42%
  9. Nicaragua - 40%
  10. Iceland - 40%
  11. Norway - 40%
  12. Mozambique - 39%
  13. Denmark - 39%
  14. Netherlands - 39%
  15. Costa Rica - 39%
  16. Timor-Leste - 39%
  17. Belgium - 38%
  18. Argentina - 37%
  19. Mexico - 37%
  20. Tanzania - 36%
  21. Spain - 36%
  22. Uganda - 35%
  23. Angola - 34%
  24. Serbia - 33%
  25. Nepal - 33%
  26. Germany - 33%
  27. Macedonia - 33%
  28. Ecuador - 32%
  29. Slovenia - 32%
  30. New Zealand - 32%
  31. Algeria - 32%
  32. Guyana - 31%
  33. Burundi - 31%
  34. Switzerland - 29%
  35. Portugal - 29%
  36. Trinidad and Tobago - 29%
  37. Austria - 28%
  38. Ethiopia - 28%
  39. Afghanistan - 28%
  40. France - 27%
  41. Lesotho - 27%
  42. Tunisia - 27%
  43. Belarus - 27%
  44. South Sudan - 27%
  45. El Salvador - 26%
  46. Bolivia - 25%
  47. Iraq - 25%
  48. Laos - 25%
  49. Canada - 25%
  50. Australia - 25%
  51. Sudan - 25%
  52. Lithuania - 25%
  53. Vietnam - 24%
  54. Namibia - 24%
  55. Kazakhstan - 24%
  56. Singapore - 24%
  57. Liechtenstein - 24%
  58. Croatia - 24%
  59. Poland - 24%
  60. Kyrgyzstan - 23%
  61. Latvia - 23%
  62. Bulgaria - 23%
  63. Philippines - 23%
  64. Pakistan - 23%
  65. United Kingdom - 23%
  66. Malawi - 22%
  67. Mauritania - 22%
  68. Czech Republic - 22%
  69. Eritrea - 22%
  70. Uzbekistan - 22%
  71. Luxembourg - 22%
  72. Peru - 22%
  73. Italy - 21%
  74. Boznia and Herzegovina - 21%
  75. China - 21%
  76. Greece - 21%
  77. Cape Verde - 21%
  78. Estonia - 21%
  79. Dominican Republic - 21%
  80. Cambodia - 20%
  81. Israel - 20%
  82. Moldova - 20%
  83. Bangladesh - 20%
  84. Honduras - 20%
  85. Monaco - 19%
  86. Tajikistan - 19%
  87. Mauritius - 19%
  88. Slovak Republic - 19%
  89. Indonesia - 19%
  90. Sao Tome and Principe - 18%
  91. United States - 18%

(source: World Bank)

(via friendlycloud)

stories-yet-to-be-written:

Too Young To Wed: A project by The United Nations Population Fund

"I was so scared, I was shaking, shaking. And whenever I saw him, I hid, I hated to see him."

- Tehani, Married at 6, Yemen

Child marriage affects one in three girls in the developing world (excluding China), and predominately impacts the poorest, least-educated girls, the majority of whom live in rural areas. Girls who get married early get pregnant early, putting their lives - and the lives of their children - at great risk. Read more about the project here.

The first photo above portraits Nujoud Ali (Yemen) in 2010. When she was only eight years old she divorced her husband, a man more than 20 years her senior. Check out her book here.

Photos by Stephanie Sinclair & Jessica Dimmock

Visit the project’s website here

(via friendlycloud)

2damnfeisty:

coreydrake:

Sister, Sistah | Girlfriends

Corey you just made my day. This entire scene is so relevant.

(via thatfeministqueer)

lolatprolife:

I believe in traditional christian marriage! *trades daughter to a stranger in exchange for two goats and some silk*

(via teaandfeminism)

Tags: marriage