newsweek:

The state of women in technology: 15 data points you should know - TechRepublic
Here are 15 important data points you should know, including a few rays of sunlight.
1. Women made up 26% of the computing workforce in 2013 That’s according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology’s most recent statistics. They also broke down the numbers even more:
3% of computing workforce were black women 5% were Asian women 2% were Hispanic women 2. Professional women earn 73 cents to the dollar vs. men According to Narrow the Gapp, that’s $333 of a weekly paycheck, which adds up to $17,316 per year. The site also says that women who work in computer and mathematical occupations make 84 cents to every dollar a man earns. That’s $214 out of her weekly paycheck. Compare that to the overall national average of women earning 80 cents to every dollar a man earns.
3. In the mid-1980s, 37% of computer science majors were women; in 2012, 18% In a study Google released last month, the company surveyed about 1,600 men and women. It showed that girls aren’t really taught what computer science actually means, and are half as likely to be encouraged to study it. The words females unassociated with computer science used to describe it were “boring,” “technology,” and “difficult.”
4. 57% of bachelor’s degrees earned by women, 12% of computer science degrees Much of this has to do with exposure to computer science before college and during college. According to Code.org, nine out of ten schools don’t even offer computer science classes, and in 28 out of 50 states, computer science doesn’t count towards a math or science credit.
5. Google’s workforce is only 30% female The company released this information back in May, along with its leadership stats: 79% male. And this isn’t just a Google problem — the same goes for Yahoo, who employs 37% women, Facebook, which is 31%, and LinkedIn, which employs 39%.
But, Google has since made strides to tackle the issue. It announced it will invest $50 million in programs to get girls more interested in STEM education and coding with a “Made With Code” campaign. Some of the money will go to Girls Who Code and Black Girls Code, The company is also working with Girl Scouts of America and female celebrities to spark girls’ interests in computer science.

newsweek:

The state of women in technology: 15 data points you should know - TechRepublic

Here are 15 important data points you should know, including a few rays of sunlight.

1. Women made up 26% of the computing workforce in 2013
That’s according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology’s most recent statistics. They also broke down the numbers even more:

3% of computing workforce were black women
5% were Asian women
2% were Hispanic women
2. Professional women earn 73 cents to the dollar vs. men
According to Narrow the Gapp, that’s $333 of a weekly paycheck, which adds up to $17,316 per year. The site also says that women who work in computer and mathematical occupations make 84 cents to every dollar a man earns. That’s $214 out of her weekly paycheck. Compare that to the overall national average of women earning 80 cents to every dollar a man earns.

3. In the mid-1980s, 37% of computer science majors were women; in 2012, 18%
In a study Google released last month, the company surveyed about 1,600 men and women. It showed that girls aren’t really taught what computer science actually means, and are half as likely to be encouraged to study it. The words females unassociated with computer science used to describe it were “boring,” “technology,” and “difficult.”

4. 57% of bachelor’s degrees earned by women, 12% of computer science degrees
Much of this has to do with exposure to computer science before college and during college. According to Code.org, nine out of ten schools don’t even offer computer science classes, and in 28 out of 50 states, computer science doesn’t count towards a math or science credit.

5. Google’s workforce is only 30% female
The company released this information back in May, along with its leadership stats: 79% male. And this isn’t just a Google problem — the same goes for Yahoo, who employs 37% women, Facebook, which is 31%, and LinkedIn, which employs 39%.

But, Google has since made strides to tackle the issue. It announced it will invest $50 million in programs to get girls more interested in STEM education and coding with a “Made With Code” campaign. Some of the money will go to Girls Who Code and Black Girls Code, The company is also working with Girl Scouts of America and female celebrities to spark girls’ interests in computer science.

(via 6stronghands)

Short summer break

So apparently my queue has run out (which I never thought would happen, I usually have the opposite problem, staying below the 300 maximum) and I’m still only on mobile with a horrible Internet connection so there will be a short break on the blog, until this weekend probably. See you all later!

Tags: psa blog stuff

dimantez4ever:

Yo every time i see NASCAR or Days of Thunder I think of her. Tia Norfleet… at 24 years of age she is the 1st and only Black Woman to Earn and recieve a NASCAR racing License. I felt like it was appropriate to write this article about Tia not to support the reverse or hidden notion of being subserviant that comes along with being the “1st black” or the “Only Black” something which we (SanCopha League) don’t agree with or support, but to show the strength of a Young Beautiful Black Woman who overcame some odds and chose to be brave enough to take role that has to be filled on the road to “Progress” however small in racial inequality. Tia chases her Dreams in a historically Bias and racist sport like NASCAR where they have been constanly taken to trial for there racist rules and behavior when it comes to participants… I never heard growing up about any woman wanting to race cars let alone working hard to actually do it and compete at its highest level. So I was pleased when I read about her and find out she the daughter of a NASCAR driver Bobby Norfleet and was inspired to be the same… Tia inspires young children by axample teaching them to chase their dreams and not be afraid to be great… Tia’s Passion for the sport is huge clearly as she worked through many low level racing Associations proving herself as she defeated competition at every level or style of racing to get where she is at now…Tia also does communtity work to aid safe driving in many southern states as well… Tia Norfleet, a show of Black Excellence and Perserverance.

dimantez4ever:

Yo every time i see NASCAR or Days of Thunder I think of her. Tia Norfleet… at 24 years of age she is the 1st and only Black Woman to Earn and recieve a NASCAR racing License. I felt like it was appropriate to write this article about Tia not to support the reverse or hidden notion of being subserviant that comes along with being the “1st black” or the “Only Black” something which we (SanCopha League) don’t agree with or support, but to show the strength of a Young Beautiful Black Woman who overcame some odds and chose to be brave enough to take role that has to be filled on the road to “Progress” however small in racial inequality. Tia chases her Dreams in a historically Bias and racist sport like NASCAR where they have been constanly taken to trial for there racist rules and behavior when it comes to participants… I never heard growing up about any woman wanting to race cars let alone working hard to actually do it and compete at its highest level. So I was pleased when I read about her and find out she the daughter of a NASCAR driver Bobby Norfleet and was inspired to be the same… Tia inspires young children by axample teaching them to chase their dreams and not be afraid to be great… Tia’s Passion for the sport is huge clearly as she worked through many low level racing Associations proving herself as she defeated competition at every level or style of racing to get where she is at now…Tia also does communtity work to aid safe driving in many southern states as well… Tia Norfleet, a show of Black Excellence and Perserverance.

(via womenwhokickass)

oldfilmsflicker:

Prior to 1940, twenty-six states had laws restricting married women from working outside of the home. After America joined WWII, a lot of these laws changed to supplement workers needed for the war effort. By 1946, with the war over, 4 million women were fired from their jobs, regardless of whether they wanted to stay on or not.

Tags: work wwii

historyheroines:

Parvin E’tesami (March 16, 1907 - April 5, 1941)
Parvin E’tesami was an Iranian writer of classical Persian poems in the early 20th century.  Her gift of poetry was discovered at an early age and encouraged by her father, a journalist and translator himself. Unaffected by the shift in modernization of the forms of Persian poetry, Parvin wrote in a classical style and used nature allegories to reflect her thoughts and observations on social and cultural aspects of a modernizing Iran.
She was born in Tabriz and received a formal education at the American Girls College in Tehran, although her studies in Arabic and classical Persian literature were fostered by her father.  In 1926 she received an invitation to become a tutor to a queen of the Pahlavi court, but she refused. 
Parvin achieved fame in her own short lifetime.  Some of her early works were published in her father’s magazine Bahar (Spring) in 1921-22, and her first collected volume of 156 poems (a Diwan) was published in 1935.  Mohammed Taqi Bahar, a renowned poet and scholar in his own right, wrote the introduction to her collection.  A second volume, edited by her brother, appeared shortly after her death in 1941.  From Wikipedia:

According to Professor Heshmat Moayyad, her Safar-e ashk (Journey of a tear) counts among the finest lyrics ever written in Persian.

More on Parvin E’tesami > 
And here (with examples of her work translated into English) >

historyheroines:

Parvin E’tesami (March 16, 1907 - April 5, 1941)

Parvin E’tesami was an Iranian writer of classical Persian poems in the early 20th century.  Her gift of poetry was discovered at an early age and encouraged by her father, a journalist and translator himself. Unaffected by the shift in modernization of the forms of Persian poetry, Parvin wrote in a classical style and used nature allegories to reflect her thoughts and observations on social and cultural aspects of a modernizing Iran.

She was born in Tabriz and received a formal education at the American Girls College in Tehran, although her studies in Arabic and classical Persian literature were fostered by her father.  In 1926 she received an invitation to become a tutor to a queen of the Pahlavi court, but she refused. 

Parvin achieved fame in her own short lifetime.  Some of her early works were published in her father’s magazine Bahar (Spring) in 1921-22, and her first collected volume of 156 poems (a Diwan) was published in 1935.  Mohammed Taqi Bahar, a renowned poet and scholar in his own right, wrote the introduction to her collection.  A second volume, edited by her brother, appeared shortly after her death in 1941.  From Wikipedia:

According to Professor Heshmat Moayyad, her Safar-e ashk (Journey of a tear) counts among the finest lyrics ever written in Persian.

More on Parvin E’tesami > 

And here (with examples of her work translated into English) >

(via womens-history)

historicwomen:

Queen Soraya Tarzi 1899- 1968
Soraya Tarzi was born in Damascus in 1899. Her family was in exile at the time but when Emir Habibullah Khan took power in Afghanistan  he invited many exiled families back to their home country. The Tarzi family returned. The family was fairly liberal and did not adhere to the more conservative rules once valued in their home country. Soraya was given a very good education and had a honorary degree from Oxford. She is thought of as one of the first Muslim woman activists.
Soraya Tarzi married Amanullah Khan, their relationship was a loving one. Soraya was his only wife, an action that broke tradition in Afghanistan. In 1926 Amanullah took the throne and Soraya became queen. Soraya accompanied Amanullah everywhere he went. Together they went to cabinet meetings, unstable regions of their country and horseback riding. 
 
Soraya wore western clothing in public, but made sure her body was covered appropriately for Islamic tradition. She did not stop wearing a veil until her husband made a public announcement that Islam did not require woman to be veiled. After the announcement, she and the other women in the royal entourage took off their veils publicly. She worked to make women in her country more independent. She established the first girl’s school and hospital in Afghanistan and arranged for 18 young women to travel to Turkey for higher education in 1928. At the seventh anniversary of Afghanistan’s independence from the British she spoke, 

"It (independence) belongs to all of us and that is why we celebrate it. Do you think, however, that our nation from the outset needs only men to serve it? Women should also take their part as women did in the early years of our nation and Islam. From their examples we must learn that we must all contribute toward the development of our nation and that this cannot be done without being equipped with knowledge. So we should all attempt to acquire as much knowledge as possible, in order that we may render our services to society in the manner of the women of early Islam." x

 Soraya and her husband’s liberal ideas were too much for Afghanistan at the time. The British government spread pictures of the Queen in Europe to conservative sects in her home country. In these pictures she was not dressed to Islamic standards and was being kissed on the hands by European men. They were exiled in 1929 and lived the rest of her life in Europe. 

historicwomen:

Queen Soraya Tarzi 1899- 1968

Soraya Tarzi was born in Damascus in 1899. Her family was in exile at the time but when Emir Habibullah Khan took power in Afghanistan  he invited many exiled families back to their home country. The Tarzi family returned. The family was fairly liberal and did not adhere to the more conservative rules once valued in their home country. Soraya was given a very good education and had a honorary degree from Oxford. She is thought of as one of the first Muslim woman activists.

Soraya Tarzi married Amanullah Khan, their relationship was a loving one. Soraya was his only wife, an action that broke tradition in Afghanistan. In 1926 Amanullah took the throne and Soraya became queen. Soraya accompanied Amanullah everywhere he went. Together they went to cabinet meetings, unstable regions of their country and horseback riding. 

 

Soraya wore western clothing in public, but made sure her body was covered appropriately for Islamic tradition. She did not stop wearing a veil until her husband made a public announcement that Islam did not require woman to be veiled. After the announcement, she and the other women in the royal entourage took off their veils publicly. She worked to make women in her country more independent. She established the first girl’s school and hospital in Afghanistan and arranged for 18 young women to travel to Turkey for higher education in 1928. At the seventh anniversary of Afghanistan’s independence from the British she spoke, 

"It (independence) belongs to all of us and that is why we celebrate it. Do you think, however, that our nation from the outset needs only men to serve it? Women should also take their part as women did in the early years of our nation and Islam. From their examples we must learn that we must all contribute toward the development of our nation and that this cannot be done without being equipped with knowledge. So we should all attempt to acquire as much knowledge as possible, in order that we may render our services to society in the manner of the women of early Islam." x

 Soraya and her husband’s liberal ideas were too much for Afghanistan at the time. The British government spread pictures of the Queen in Europe to conservative sects in her home country. In these pictures she was not dressed to Islamic standards and was being kissed on the hands by European men. They were exiled in 1929 and lived the rest of her life in Europe. 

(via womens-history)

selfrescuingprincesssociety:

Ana Mendieta (18 November 1948 – 8 September 1985)Ana Mendieta was a Cuban American performance artist, sculptor, painter and video artist who is best known for her “earth-body” art work. At age 12, in order to escape Fidel Castro’s regime, Ana and her 14-year-old sister Raquelin were sent to the United States by their parents.Mendieta’s work was generally autobiographical and focused on themes including feminism, violence, life, death, place and belonging. Mendieta often focused on a spiritual and physical connection with the Earth, most particularly in her “Silueta Series” (1973–1980). The series involved Mendieta creating female silhouettes in nature - in mud, sand and grass - with natural materials ranging from leaves and twigs to blood, and making body prints or painting her outline or silhouette onto a wall. Mendieta was one of many artists experimenting with the emerging genres of land art, body art, and performance art. Mendieta was possibly the first to combine these genres in what she called “earth-body” sculptures. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ana_Mendieta

selfrescuingprincesssociety:

Ana Mendieta (18 November 1948 – 8 September 1985)

Ana Mendieta was a Cuban American performance artist, sculptor, painter and video artist who is best known for her “earth-body” art work.

At age 12, in order to escape Fidel Castro’s regime, Ana and her 14-year-old sister Raquelin were sent to the United States by their parents.

Mendieta’s work was generally autobiographical and focused on themes including feminism, violence, life, death, place and belonging. Mendieta often focused on a spiritual and physical connection with the Earth, most particularly in her “Silueta Series” (1973–1980). The series involved Mendieta creating female silhouettes in nature - in mud, sand and grass - with natural materials ranging from leaves and twigs to blood, and making body prints or painting her outline or silhouette onto a wall. Mendieta was one of many artists experimenting with the emerging genres of land art, body art, and performance art. Mendieta was possibly the first to combine these genres in what she called “earth-body” sculptures.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ana_Mendieta

secondworldwarineurope:

Lyudmila Pavlichenko, a Soviet Sniper, had killed a confirmed 309 Germans during WWII and is regarded as the most successful female sniper in history. (source)

(via womens-history)

famouswomeninhistory:

"Something which we think is impossible now is not impossible in another decade." — Constance Baker Motley

famouswomeninhistory:

"Something which we think is impossible now is not impossible in another decade." 
— Constance Baker Motley

(via womens-history)

secondworldwarineurope:

"Little known to the outside world, although they have been fighting fascist regimes since 1927, the Italian ‘Maquis’ carry on their battle for freedom under the most hazardous conditions. Germans and fascist Italians are targets for their guns; and the icy, eternally snow-clad peaks of the French-Italian border are their battlefield. This school teacher of the Valley of Aosta fights side-by-side with her husband in the ‘White Patrol’ above the pass of Little Saint Bernard in Italy, on January 4, 1945." (source)

secondworldwarineurope:

"Little known to the outside world, although they have been fighting fascist regimes since 1927, the Italian ‘Maquis’ carry on their battle for freedom under the most hazardous conditions. Germans and fascist Italians are targets for their guns; and the icy, eternally snow-clad peaks of the French-Italian border are their battlefield. This school teacher of the Valley of Aosta fights side-by-side with her husband in the ‘White Patrol’ above the pass of Little Saint Bernard in Italy, on January 4, 1945." (source)

(via womens-history)

(Source: riley1cannon)

quintessence-of-dust:

Kacy Catanzaro: the first woman in history to qualify for Mt. Midoriyama.

I just need everyone to watch this video [x]. She’s a 5 foot, 100 lb gymnast and she beasts through this insanely difficult, heavily upper body focused course like it was her morning jog. The camera keeps cutting to these massive, musclebound men in the audience with their mouths hanging open. 

(Source: felicityperhaps, via gtfothinspo)