stfueverything:

lesbolution:

[x]

[TW:ABUSE, VIOLENCE]

(via thebiobabe)

astro-feminist:

"I haven’t always been an advocate for “women’s issues” in academia.  I have distinct [not-so-distant] memories of rolling my eyes when hearing about ‘diversity workshops’ or scholarship/fellowship opportunities only available to women or men of color or white women.  I thought we were beyond this. I thought the playing field was leveled.  I even thought such `nonsense’ did a disservice to underrepresented groups in science by unnecessarily reminding them of their uphill battle and struggles of the past.  And then I had a major wake up call.

“Wake up call” isn’t really the right term. I didn’t suddenly wake up one day and see that I lived in a world different to the one I knew growing up. “Waking up” took years of thought, questioning, self-doubt, and help from colleagues and friends, but it eventually happened.  I woke up to a world where I had been a reluctant recipient of sexual harassment and hated my job as a result.  It was a job I had once loved and invested so much in.  I was depressed, isolated and ready to quit. I blamed myself and my incompetence for a whole lot of strange, uncomfortable interactions with colleagues. 

(via selfrescuingprincesssociety)

"

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

Even when I was explicitly trying, I still failed to have the discussion participants fairly represent the population of the students in my classroom.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it’s called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are ‘hogging the floor’ even when men are dominating.

"

Stop interrupting me: gender, conversation dominance and listener bias, by Jessica Kirkpatrick from Women In Astronomy

(Source: nosquirrelno, via selfrescuingprincesssociety)

Wonderful Woman Wednesday: Katherine Johnson

mumlymag:

image

[Image credit: NASA]

[Born Aug 26 1918]

She was taught from her youth, “you are as good as anybody in this town, but you’re no better”, meaning that though she may be a brilliant mathematician, that was no reason to look down on anyone.

She lived in a time when “Computer” was a job title and she was instrumental in doing the maths responsible for putting men on the moon.

When she skipped through grades due to her brilliance, she did not see her gifts as a source of employment. Her professor believed in her, and made sure she was prepared to become a research mathematician.

She took up a teaching job until she noticed that they were looking for Computers in Langley.

She was instrumental in literally writing the book on going to space.

She did all the mathematics involved in landing the space capsules. She said, “'Let me do it. You tell me when you want it and where you want it to land, and I'll do it backwards and tell you when to take off.”

Even though the final calculations were done with electronic computers, NASA always came back to Katherine to check the math.

Sources on Katherine: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

(via selfrescuingprincesssociety)

nihileigh:

When we live in a world where you can access free content of naked consenting women in less than 5 seconds, why are people still invading the privacy of non-consenting women for nudes?

Hint: It has something to do with people feeling entitled to making any woman their personal porn, even if it violates or humiliates her in the process.

(via official-mens-frights-activist)

Tags: privacy porn

"

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

"

Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)

This. So much this. I cannot stand these movies anymore, I’m so fucking done with this trope. 

(via astolat)

(via ninja-suffragette)

Tags: movies tropes

prairiefunk:

Barbara McClintock by chid0 :
Barbara McClintock, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1983 for her discovery of transposable genetic elements. The remarkable thing about her discovery is among other things the fact that she did so as early as the 1940’s. Way before anyone had an idea about molecular structure of DNA. Genetics was an obscure and unfashionable field at that time. Noone really believed her. Until all those famous others like Morgan, Watson, Crick, Pauling etc. made their discoveries - and her work was reestablished.But there is another reason why I chose her, one that is even more important for me. Howard Green, a colleague, wrote this about her after she died in 1992:"Barbara McClintock was a woman who rejected a woman’s life for herself. She began to do it as a small child and never deviated. Her childhood was not a happy one, and perhaps this provided the force, the moral tension that was so strong in her and so necessary for the life she lived. And we must not forget that at the foundation of every creative life there lies a sense of personal inadequacy that energizes the struggle. This sense was strong in Barbara."

prairiefunk:

Barbara McClintock by chid0 :

Barbara McClintock, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1983 for her discovery of transposable genetic elements. The remarkable thing about her discovery is among other things the fact that she did so as early as the 1940’s. Way before anyone had an idea about molecular structure of DNA. Genetics was an obscure and unfashionable field at that time. Noone really believed her. Until all those famous others like Morgan, Watson, Crick, Pauling etc. made their discoveries - and her work was reestablished.

But there is another reason why I chose her, one that is even more important for me. Howard Green, a colleague, wrote this about her after she died in 1992:

"Barbara McClintock was a woman who rejected a woman’s life for herself. She began to do it as a small child and never deviated. Her childhood was not a happy one, and perhaps this provided the force, the moral tension that was so strong in her and so necessary for the life she lived. And we must not forget that at the foundation of every creative life there lies a sense of personal inadequacy that energizes the struggle. This sense was strong in Barbara."

(via womenwhokickass)

-teesa-:

9.9.14

It’s this idea of “Hey, dudes are dudes.”

(via upworthy)

feedthenose:

sorry cant quite hear u over how cute i am ???? 

(Source: , via gtfothinspo)

Tags: disability

crumblingpages:

image

"Why shouldn’t a Japanese woman navigate the air as well and skillfully as her American sister?

No reason at all, affirmed little Yoneko Samina, who stepped from her monoplane nonchalantly.

The bright-eyed resident of the chrysanthemum land is in the United States to perfect herself in…

huffingtonpost:

Know Your Veils: A Guide to Middle Eastern Head Coverings (PHOTOS)

Next time you are having dinner with a Bahraini dignitary, don’t embarrass yourself by confusing the Queen’s abaya with a burqa.

Simply read our full guide with the full explanations behind every Islamic veil here. 

(via lipstick-feminists)